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2050: THE YEAR OF INSTANT OIL

  Another holiday in the near future. Your family is on a road trip, and after several hours, it’s time to fill up. Oil and coal are in short supply, and foreign superpowers…

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Top 10 Science Myths

 ”The Great  Wall of China  is visible  from space” The 2,200-year-old Chinese structure is impressive. But it cannot be observed from space – and certainly not from the Moon. Unless you have super-vision….

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Molecular Murder

Nature’s most potent poisons attack the tiniest building blocks of our bodies: the cells. Poisons can effect as little as one molecule – but this has fatal consequences. Even the slightest molecular change…

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Super Telescopes

SOLVING THE MYSTERIES OF THE UNIVERSE In the most desolate regions of the globe, astronomers and engineers are building a new generation of super telescopes. The high-tech structures will be spread across several…

DIY Space Program

Sandy Antunes did not react to his threatening midlife crisis by buying a motorcycle or climbing mountains. Instead, the 46-year-old American built his own small, customised satellite. Picosatellites like his are available as…

Teenagers have more flexible brains than adults and find it easier to adapt to new technology. Image: VLADGRIN/Shutterstock

Teenage brains in the digital world

When it comes to technology, adults won’t be able to keep up with their children.

The Abel Tasman could start fishing for jack mackerel and redbait in Australian waters. Image: Shutterstock

Can Australia’s shores cope with a super trawler?

What do history and science tell us about the impacts of trawling.

Captivity and a vaccination may now be the only way to save this iconic animal. Image: Cloudia Newland/Shutterstock

Deadly devil disease is here to stay

The devil is apparently in the chromosomes.

Bananas, berries and chocolate are all examples of good-mood foods. Image: Gregory Gerber/Shutterstock

You are what you eat

Avoid the blues with certain food flavours.

The North African ostrich is the fastest running bird with a speed of 18 metres per second. Image: jo Crebbin/Shutterstock

Animals would trump Olympic athletes

If animals were allowed to compete in the Olympics, we wouldn’t really stand much of a chance.

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