Jez Ford
Nature Book Week

Nature Book Week – free online events from 6 September

The Wilderness Society’s Nature Book Week starts on 6 September, with science communicator Dr Jen Martin as his year’s Nature Book Week Ambassador, leading a series of workshops, talks and events – just…

Credit: National Science Week

National Science Week is over – wasn’t it great!

National Science Week 2021 ran from 14 to 24 August, with this year’s festival incorporating thousands of events around Australia on science subjects as diverse as health, sport, technology, Indigenous health, farming, food,…

ANSTO

Synchrotron – Australia’s great ring of light

Greg Le Blanc and his team are some 22km south-east of the CBD in Melbourne, working underground in the middle of the night. In an enclosed room they huddle over monitor screens, while…

UniSA

Could we use solar power to purify drinking water?

There has been significant recent research into the possibility of desalination using photo-thermal evaporators powered only by sunlight. The problem has been achieving an efficiency high enough to make such devices practical. Scientists…

Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

Australia’s new leader in botanical science

Australia has a new scientific institute that brings together an astoundingly broad sweep of botanic research organisations and collections, services and facilities.  The Australian Institute of Botanical Science is positioned to become a…

shutterstock og Malene Vinther

Your vaccines are ready – how they did it in under a year

More than 180 different COVID-19 vaccines were in the initial pipeline – and the majority of them can be placed in one of four vaccine categories. One is a classic. Two are comparatively…

shutterstock

Why do our eyes water when we chop up onions?

Onions emit a sulphur-containing gas when they are chopped. The gas irritates the cells of the eye, which react by producing tears that are intended to clear away the substance. In ordinary onions,…

Kyung Soo Kim et al./Nature/ r. Anthony Romilio

This prehistoric croc was faster on two legs, despite having flat feet

Scientists have found evidence that crocodile ancestors walked on their hind legs – like a Tyrannosaurus rex. Modern crocodiles crawl forwards with four legs all to the sides, but 120 million years ago,…

IMP/L.Schedl

Aussie lungfish has largest animal genome known to science

Scientists are teasing out the secrets that place the Australian lungfish near a critical moment of evolution. A team of researchers at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna has sequenced…

New issue out now! Quasars, anxiety, underwater killers, quantum computers and the Doomsday Glacier…

Issue #80 of Australian Science Illustrated publishes today! Learn about the cosmic storms generated by quasars, the world-changing ways of quantum computers, the promising future of wave energy, the frightening hunting methods of…

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