Do trees stop growing?

Giant sequoia. Image: Shutterstock.

The short answer is no.

The girth of a tree changes constantly; it expands, adding growth ring upon growth ring–and it will not stop unless felled by a natural event or a chainsaw.

Each tree species has a height limit, and it is based on its vascular system and how far it can carry water up from the roots. Some of the world’s tallest trees can be found in:

Redwood National Park, US: Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), approx. 115 metres.
Hobart, Australia: Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans), approx. 99 metres.
Brummit Creek, Coos County, US: Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), approx. 99 metres.
Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, US: Spruce (Picea sitchensis), approx.96 metres.
Redwood Mountain Grove, US: Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum): approx. 94 metres.

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  1. Trees do stop growing during winter and ice ages what is why you cant tell how old a tree is because the rings are off by how long the winter is….I am 15 and I know this try telling me other wise?

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